Direct Observation: Two Approaches, Kathy Gore Fuss & Amy Huddleston

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May 7 – June 30, 2016
Reception for the artists: May 7, 2 – 4pm

Both Kathy Gore Fuss and Amy Huddleston work from direct observation, but they use this traditional tool very differently. One would never confuse their two bodies of work.

In a recent artist statement, Amy Huddleston write: “Two years ago I decided to work entirely from observation, with a muted and limited palette.  I learned a great deal through this work; which was based on measuring in order to help me better understand spatial relationships. I felt a strong desire to see what this could bring to my work.”

Huddleston’s passion is for observation detached from narrative. Because she knows how to paint well indeed, her straightforward approach will have its rewards, among them, allowing psychological expression to be a by-product, rather than the intention of her efforts. This compelling subjective expression, while it arrives without invitation, does become a significant aspect of her work. – Norman Lundin

Artist Interview #42: Amy Huddleston, Part 2

Amy participated in our interview series as part of a previous exhibition (artist interview #12).

huddlestonstudio 2016 1
1. In your drawings and paintings, what does it mean for you to succeed?
I must like it.

2. In your recent artist’s statement, you wrote that you are working on small works that help you further refine the “how” of your process. What have you discerned about your process through working on these?
That it changes, attempts at approaching work the exact same way; same support, paint etc., is too rigid for me, at least currently, I see glimpses of future definitiveness, but I tend toward mirages.

3. How do you understand form in relation to expressing your observational experience?
By asking myself, when looking at something, what exists in this particular visual field, and how can I use it to make a visual experience that draws people toward it, for whatever reason. If I can figure out what draws me to a form I can potentially use that information to construct, or rather, reconstruct this information; not in order to get the same viewpoint but to gain another.

4. What can you tell us about the expressive results (the expression) of your observational experience?
That it is determined along the way, as the work moves forward. It is not a preconceived notion. Largely, it is determined by eliminating things I do not like rather than adding things that I do.

5. What is your ideal working environment?
You can never have too much space, light, or music.

“Observing Observing (a white cup): Anne Petty”

With each exhibition, we will post interviews with the participating artists along with a photo of said artists in their studios and images of their work. In the future, we will post videos of artist interviews.

“Observing Observing (a white cup)” opens September 12th and continues through October 31, 2015

Curated by Eric Elliott, Michael Howard & Norman Lundin. More than twenty artists (both gallery artists and not) accepted the invitation to submit work.

Reception for the artists, Sept. 12, 2 – 4 pm

Artist Interview #15: Anne Petty

1. How did you respond to the idea of the white cup?

My first instinct was to stick a figure into the paintings, as that is my usual subject matter, however I don’t often paint still life’s, so I thought I’d take this as an opportunity to do so. The cup I used is ceramic and reflective. I wanted to use that quality and set the cup next to images I like—one being a postcard of a Picasso painting and another a book with a painting by de Kooning on the cover. It was an excuse to revisit other people’s paintings I admire.

2. Are you a full time artist, if not how do you support your art?

In addition to my studio work, I work part time teaching painting and drawing at Gage Academy in Seattle and nanny during the afternoons during the week. I like the balance each job offers.

3. When did you consider yourself an artist?

I’ve been making art of some kind since I was young, but it wasn’t until I completed all of my schooling that I felt comfortable introducing myself as an artist.

4. What are your influences?

While I find inspiration all over, my biggest influences are people—their gestures, form, idiosyncrasies, and psychology are all incredibly interesting to me. People watching is one of my favorite activities. Like most artists, I also look at and am influenced by others people’s paintings. Artists such as Lucian Freud, Goya, de Kooning, Paula Rego, Ann Gale, and Kyle Staver are some of my particular favorites, although the list is long. I also look to film and photography, in particular directors and photographers like Hitchcock, Garry Winogrand, and Cindy Sherman.

5. How big is your studio, what kind of lighting?

My studio is about 110 sq. feet. I just moved studios this past week and am still settling into the new space and getting organized. I do have natural lighting, but also lights with both warm and cool bulbs to get a nice temperature balance and for consistency. Having lighting I can control is essential.

6. What is a typical day in the studio like for you? Do you listen to music, radio or tv in your studio?

I tend to do the bulk of my painting in the morning and early afternoon. When I first arrive I will assess where I’m at in a painting through writing, drawing or just looking. I think better with silence, so I’ll hold off on music or podcasts until I get into a painting groove. When I first start working, it’s also the time where I will take care of any research needs for the day (look through images I’ve taken, find interesting film stills or images online, study other artists’ paintings, etc.). After that, the rest of my time is ideally spent painting, often while listening to music or a podcast.

7. What is your preferred medium? Do you work on one project at a time or several?

I do most of my work in oils, but I also watercolor and draw. I feel best when I have several paintings going at once, usually all examining a similar idea or concept. I find it helps to take some of the pressure away from an individual piece and as a result I am better at taking risks.

8. Do you have any special or unique tools, devices or process that you use in your art making?

I’m fairly straight forward with my materials, so no, nothing out of the ordinary.

9. What do you do outside the studio, aside from a job?

I like to spend time biking, traveling, and trying new food with my husband, Sean (ideally all combined into one event). I also am an avid reader and always carry a book with me.

“Observing Observing (a white cup): Amy Huddleston”

With each exhibition, we will post interviews with the participating artists along with a photo of said artists in their studios and images of their work. In the future, we will post videos of artist interviews.

“Observing Observing (a white cup)” opens September 12th and continues through October 31, 2015

Curated by Eric Elliott, Michael Howard & Norman Lundin. More than twenty artists (both gallery artists and not) accepted the invitation to submit work.

Reception for the artists, Sept. 12, 2 – 4 pm

Artist Interview #12: Amy Huddleston

Amy Huddlest

1. How did you respond to the idea of the white cup?

The same way I approach all my work; I ask myself, what do I want this work to evoke, and what approach do I use to do it?

2. Are you a full time artist, if not how do you support your art?

Yes.

3. When did you consider yourself an artist?

Other people started calling me an artist around 12 or 13 years old, I bought it.

4. What are your influences?

Currently, light, form, paint itself; and the idea that it can evoke a multitude of things.

5. How big is your studio, what kind of lighting?

My studio is about 250 sq ft. The space has lots of natural light via 3 large picture windows and two skylights.

6. What is a typical day in the studio like for you? Do you listen to music, radio or tv in your studio?

Typically, I organize or clean up a bit, then start work on what I have going on at the time. I have music in the background.

7. What is your preferred medium? Do you work on one project at a time or several?

Casein is currently the medium I am using/prefer, but I also use oil and acrylic. I have always gone back and forth between projects.

8. Do you have any special or unique tools, devices or process that you use in your art making?

Not really.

9. What do you do outside the studio, aside from a job?

I spend time with my family and friends doing the typical things people do.

"Night Cup", 2015, oil on linen, 14 x 20.5"

“Night Cup”, 2015, oil on linen, 14 x 20.5″