“Observing Observing (a white cup): David Campbell”

With each exhibition, we will post interviews with the participating artists along with a photo of said artists in their studios and images of their work. In the future, we will post videos of artist interviews.

“Observing Observing (a white cup)” opens September 12th and continues through October 31, 2015

Curated by Eric Elliott, Michael Howard & Norman Lundin. More than twenty artists (both gallery artists and not) accepted the invitation to submit work.

Reception for the artists, Sept. 12, 2 – 4 pm

Artist Interview #16: David Campbell

1. How did you respond to the idea of the white cup?

When I paint, it is essential for the initial inspiration to derive from a visual excitement, followed by the development of the concept or narrative, if at all. If the perceptual jolt isn’t there, then I am wasting my time. Considering that, there was a good deal of false starts during the outset of this “white cup” theme. Creating and then finding a stage that had all the necessary cues that could jump-start some sort of visceral response was surprisingly difficult.

2. Are you a full time artist, if not how do you support your art?

I am not a full time artist even though I consider myself fortunate to have as much time as I do to paint. I teach at the College of William & Mary, which in turn feeds me when I return to the studio. I don’t think I would ever want to stop teaching.

3. When did you consider yourself an artist?

I consider myself more of a painter than an artist, which I understand can sound like a false sense of humility; but it feels weird giving myself that title. I always knew I wanted to be a painter since I began art school in the 90s, even though I felt less like a painter back then. I think it takes time to recognize what painting is and how it should function….. as it should.

4. What are your influences?

My influences include: my sight, other painters, film, music, dreams, nature, and spirituality.

5. How big is your studio, what kind of lighting?

My studio is approximately 13×17’. It has north lighting, although it’s a bit dark. I’d like to put a skylight in some day.

6. What is a typical day in the studio like for you? Do you listen to music, radio or tv in your studio?

I try to paint for about 4-5 hours at a time per day. Which a lot of times end up feeling like daily “sprints” compared to monthly “marathons”, if that makes sense. Music is essential while I work. It’s just distracting enough to help me not be too conscious of what I’m doing.

7. What is your preferred medium? Do you work on one project at a time or several?

I work in oil on either shellacked museum board or oil primed linen. I primarily use the palette knife, but am working my way back to the brush. I’m actually pretty temperamental and bounce around from one idea or project to the next. After working all over the place for a bit, a group of paintings or concerns end up rising to the top and I become pretty myopic.

8. Do you have any special or unique tools, devices or process that you use in your art making?

At times I’ll use a 24” wallpaper scraper if I feel that the painting needs to be scraped down, unified or roughed up a bit.

9. What do you do outside the studio, aside from a job?

I spend a lot of time listening to music, maybe too much time. I’m always trying to find the soundtrack to my life.

“Canopies: Evelyn Woods”

With each exhibition, we will post interviews with the participating artists along with a photo of said artists in their studios and images of their work. In the future, we will post videos of artist interviews.

“Canopies” opens June 27th and continues through August 22, 2015

The exhibitions includes the work of Kimberly Clark, Eric Elliott, Tamblyn Gawley & Evelyn Woods.

Reception for the artists, June 27th, 2 – 4 pm

Artist Interview #9: Evelyn Woods

Evelyn Wood_0061

1. Are you a full time artist, if not how do you support your art?

Unfortunately not… I mainly support myself as an artist as an LMP (licensed
massage practitioner). In addition, I do some window display design which
includes the construction and installation of props and some interior retail
merchandising. Being self-employed allows me to create big chunks of time
that I can spend in the studio.

2. When did you consider yourself an artist?

I found this to be an interesting question. So, I thought about what defines an
artist. So, I googled it. Here’s Wikipedia’s definition. “An artist​ is a person
engaged in one or more of any of a broad spectrum of activities related to
creating art, practicing the arts, and/or demonstrating an art. The common usage
in both everyday speech and academic discourse is a practitioner in the visual
arts only.” Simple enough. So I questioned when I felt I was a “serious” artist
and can say that that process started after having completed graduate school
and continues as I question myself constantly. External validation is a wonderful
thing but certainly not always forthcoming. So what’s important to me is knowing
internally that I am a serious artist.

3. What are your influences?

In the past when I was mainly working in charcoal I was influenced by the works
of Louise Nevelson. Loved all that going in and out of those dark spaces she
created with found scraps. Currently my focus has been on painting the natural
world. Trees, scrubby brush, brambles and reeds etc. What draws me to these
images is not the literal image so much as how I feel about them and what my
experience has been when in nature which reaches back into my childhood.
Again my work is about going inside.

4. How big is your studio, what kind of lighting?

I previously had a studio that was 600sq. ft. in size. For lighting I installed full
spectrum daylight fluorescents. Then I sold my home and studio. I currently have
the good fortune to be able to work in 100 year old boathouse with a wonderful
view of Puget Sound. The lighting is a bit makeshift in that it is a combination of
halogen and your basic hardware store clip­on lights. The next studio I build may
not be a large as the first but will have the same lighting.

5. What is a typical day in the studio like for you? Do you listen to music, radio or tv in your studio?

I like to start the day slowly. Have a pot of tea and think about the day followed
by a brisk walk just to clear the brain. I used to listen to music but found that
listening to audiobooks helps me to be less self­conscious about painting. I have
found that listening to a story and painting at the same time really engages my
brain and I don’t feel bad about not reading as much as I would like to.

6. What is your preferred medium? Do you work on one project at a time or several?

Pretty straightforward stuff. Oil paints,charcoal,gesso and graphite. I usually
work on one piece at a time although I will put one aside if I feel stuck or unsure
about my direction. At that time I will start a new work and pull out the previous
work later to see if it can be saved. I usually have about three pieces in my mind
that I can’t wait to get started on.

7. Do you have any special or unique tools, devices or process that you use in your art making?

Yes and no. My charcoal drawings are all drawn using a subtractive technique.
Not unusual but the way I adhere the charcoal to the primed paper via a solvent
might be. After the solvent dries I am left with this very rich and warm black
surface. I paint with oils using standard painting techniques.

8. What do you do outside the studio, aside from a job?

evelyn yoga

I always feel in my element when taking long walks, usually solitary walks. Doing
my yoga practice is a must both physically and mentally. Love digging in the dirt
and growing a garden which produces some wonderful stuff to cook with.
Another of my passions, cooking and eating. Spending time with my loved ones
and a few very good friends is a high priority. I have a two and a half year old
grandson who I get to spend one day a week with since he was three months old.
That time with him keeps me both active and young in spirit!